Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Tales of Leo #4, on second thought...


You ever have one of those moments where you inexplicably find yourself thinking about a story you initially had a concrete reaction to, only to suddenly look at it from a new angle and come to a completely different conclusion?

Well, I had such an epiphany about the ending to the miniseries Tales of Leonardo: Blind Sight, and added an update to my review to account for that.  It's a little thing and not a substantial update, but I figured I'd post it.

I don't think it changes my emotional evaluation of the ending (I still don't care for it), but I can at least give Lawson credit that maybe he was going for something entirely different from my initial interpretation.  If anything, this was more an exercise in reevaluation and sometimes that can be a cathartic experience in and of itself.

So for all those out there who liked "Blind Sight" and didn't appreciate my initial negative reaction, maybe I'm starting to see things your way.  At least a little bit.  (Leo is still a prick at the end of the arc no matter how you slice it, which might have been Lawson's bleak and cynical point.)

3 comments:

Adam Winters said...

I do think the Leo: Blind Sight is the best of the Mirage Volume 4 era mini-series. Too bad I never posted my thoughts in comment form on the previous posts. It isn't a tightly focused story, but it certainly is interesting artistically and is a much more ambitious attempt at character development than any of the other three series.

I own it in TPB (which may actually be somewhat rare these days), and it reads well in that format, although the usage of 4Kids stock art for Master Splinter's silhouette on the back cover is embarrassing:
http://forums.thetechnodrome.com/showthread.php?t=32446

Also... the TPB lacks the frontispiece to Tales of TMNT #5. Poor show, Mirage.

Anonymous said...

Have you thought about just emailing Lawson and asking him what he intended?

Mark Pellegrini said...

@Anonymous

Because asking the author for the "answer" kind of eliminates the point of interpretive works.